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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  May 18, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm sophie long live in west yorkshire. the headlines at 11: theresa may will launch the conservative manifesto here in west yorkshire, where she will promise to address the rising cost of social care in england. the conservatives are also promising new measures to curb immigration, as well as restating their commitment to cut the net figure to the tens of thousands. the tory manifesto also proposes to introduce mea ns—testing for winter fuel payments, taking away payments of up to £300 from wealthier pensioners. we will take you through all of the details... other stories developing at this hour... the us government appoints a former fbi chief as special counsel to investigate alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election.
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and any ties to trump's campaign. the former tv presenter rolf harris is being released on bail tomorrow. the veteran entertainer is currently on trial accused of indecently assaulting three girls between 1971 and 1983. retail sales rose by 2.3% last month — defying market expectations that rising inflation would cause a consumer slowdown. hello and good morning. welcome to bbc news. i'm sophie long, in west yorkshire. where theresa may will promise
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to address the rising cost of social care in england and curb immigration — when she launches the conservative manifesto shortly. it has been delayed due to travel problems and there have been a couple of protests which have sprung up. small protests at this stage. one to the side of the building and another to the entrance. shortly theresa may will arrive here and unveiled the conservative party plans for the election. let's take you through what we are expecting to hear from theresa may at this stage... the party is promising that no—one will have to sell their property in their lifetime to fund their care, but the cost will be recouped when they die. the threshold would rise from the current £23,250 to £100,000, meaning the family assets would not be depleted below that level to pay for care. for the first time, the value of a person's property would be taken into account in assessing whether they're eligible for free care. on migration, the manifesto is expected to include a pledge asking firms to pay more to hire
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migrant workers from outside the eu, who will in turn be asked to pay more to use the nhs. it will also restate the party's commitment to bringing net migration down to the tens of thousands. on education, the conservatives are expected to scrap universal free school lunches for infants to pay for free breakfasts for all primary pupils in england. on the labour market, they are expected to reward firms that hire people from so—called ‘vulnerable‘ groups, such as people with disabilities, long term unemployed or ex—prisoners, with one year's exemption from national insurance contributions. with more on the conservative party manifesto, our political correspondent iain watson reports. when her manifesto is unveiled, theresa may promises to create greater fairness between the generations and to offer help where it is needed. previous conservative commitments
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to protect pensioner incomes will be ditched. regardless of their wealth. if re—elected, the pensions triple lock would become a double lock in 2020. the state pension would rise in line with earnings, but a minimum 2.5% annual increase would not be guaranteed. winter fuel payments would be means tested to help meet the costs of social care. for the first time, many elderly people receiving care in their own home would have to make a contribution to the cost. the full cost for residential care and care at home would only be applied to people with assets above £100,000. payment could be deferred until after death. at the other end, schools in england would be protected from any losses from a new funding formula.
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this pledge comes at a price. free school meals for infants would be canned. schools would have to provide breakfasts and children from poor backgrounds would be provided free meals. they hope theresa may will demonstrate that she is willing to take big, difficult decisions and provide proof that her premiership would not be defined by the phrase — brexit means brexit. iain watson, bbc news. theresa may has talked about long—term plans to address the crisis in the cost of social care. we expect it to feature heavily in the conservative party manifesto which will be launched later this morning. jeremy hunt has been out this morning, talking about the pledge that no one will have to sell their property to pay for their care. the health secretaryjeremy hunt has denied that conservative plans to reform social care
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amount to a "death tax". everybody can have the security knowing that they can pass on £100,000 to their children and grandchildren. you can be cleaned out to £23,000, four times more. the reason it matters is because many grandparents worry that the standard of living their grandchildren and children have maybe less than their own so children have maybe less than their own so they want to be able to pass on the savings they worked hard for all of their lives. to pay for that we say there is a trade off and on the winter fuel payment that will be available for the poorest pensioners, those at risk of going into fuel poverty, but not other pensioners. the cost of these measures and giving security to every family in the country, they will be able to pass on assets they worked hard to build on all their lives, at least £100,000, is around £2 billion per year which can be funded by restricting the winter fuel payment to the poorest pensioners, as i say. and also by
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simplifying how we do means testing for people who need state funded social care. you take those together, you raise that money, and you will be open that there is a trade—off. i think that is what theresa may's leadership is about. if we are going to make britain work for ordinary working families, there are no silver bullets. there are difficult trade—offs. jeremy hunt, health secretary, speaking earlier this morning to the bbc. our assistant political editor norman smithjoins me now. he has been following all of the campaigning and the manifesto launches. we know quite a bit of what we can expect from theresa may this morning, can you take us through the main points? what's the most interesting thing? the break with the cameron years, theresa may isjunking a with the cameron years, theresa may is junking a pile with the cameron years, theresa may isjunking a pile of david cameron's iconic policies. out goes the tax lock, out goes the pension pledge. end of free school meals. forget the
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idea of a cap on social care. it is alljunk. a idea of a cap on social care. it is all junk. a complete idea of a cap on social care. it is alljunk. a complete break with the cameron years. mrs may seemed to be ready to confront issues in society, showing the cameron years were protected and shielded from the full blast of posterity. top of the pile is pensioners, if you are a wealthy pensioner, and you lose your winter fuel allowance, you lose two of the guarantees that your pension will rise by 2.5% come what may. most contentious of all are the changes in reforms on social care. this is packaged up as a major reform. it is, and will help people with lower incomes. it will be much less useful to middle—class and better off families who have houses. they are going to continue by and large having to pay to fund their own care. only when all of their assets are reduced to £100,000 will the state step in. a significant break
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over the last ten years. and when you go through this, she is aiming as pleasing a very wide audience. right in the centre are these people, who are just managing, that she has spoken so much about. when it comes to social care it is a message to them? yes, what we are seeing is mrs may following through ona seeing is mrs may following through on a lot of the language that we have heard. they have got a job, but things are tough. they are on fairly low incomes, standards of living have stalled. she is tried to focus everything on them so we get a package of measures on employment rights and trying to boost pupils working conditions, protecting their pensions, all of that sort of stuff. when it comes to the middle classes, they are not getting much at all. it seems to me there is a distinct tilt to help lower income families. and saying to the middle classes, manage on your own two feet, don't expect the state to bail you out. sort yourselves out.
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a marked change from the tory party of years gone by. and they word on where we are? the conservative party ma nifesto where we are? the conservative party manifesto launch, we are in west yorkshire, it has been a while since they launched that campaign ma nifesto they launched that campaign manifesto this far north? yes, it says something about team made, they won't talk about a landslide. —— tea m won't talk about a landslide. —— team may. they are words thatjeremy corbyn. it is also, i think interesting that theresa may feels that she has to make a mark now. she could have sat back and said, i need to do with brexit. an enormous political task, i don't have much time to be faffing around with other bits and pieces. she has done the opposite and come forward with chunky policy proposals. in other words, forward with chunky policy proposals. in otherwords, it forward with chunky policy proposals. in other words, it seems to me she is saying, don't think i am only brexit, that i a lot of
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other things i want to do. what we get today is a statement of intent from theresa may, a very ambitious agenda, but it is a very distinctive theresa may agenda. there are a lot of things in this which do not look like a tory party agenda at all. energy caps, intervening in the free market, forcing people to sell land to build council housing and lower market rates. this is not tory policy. a lot of tories will be thinking, what is going on? this sounds like quite a lot of involvement of the government but theresa may is clearly positioning herself as the kind of tory who is willing to use the state in a way where traditionally tories have been relu cta nt to where traditionally tories have been reluctant to do so. norman, we will speak to you more throughout the day. thank you. alison holt is live in central london for us, and she has been
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looking in detail at the policies on social care that we have been speaking about so far. can you talk us speaking about so far. can you talk us through what you make of them at the moment? giving with one hand but taking with the other? yes, generally i think these are plans greeted with a degree of surprise from many people working in the care sector. they were expecting one thing, possibly the confirmation of a cap on high care costs. but, that is not there. legislation was in place for that but that has been scrapped. instead, we have a raising of the threshold of money that people can keep if they have care costs. it is being raised from £23,250 to £100,000. it is complicated but basically the way that it works is that you would pay any ca re that it works is that you would pay any care costs until you are... your assets and savings of £100,000 are reached. then you would get help
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from your local authority to some degree or another. that is a significant increase in that baseline of savings you can keep. and it would help many people in residential homes. the sting in the tale is that there is also a proposal to change the way in which calculations are done for those who need home care. the plan would be to include the value of someone's home in the calculation of their assets for home care. the conservative party is saying that what they would then do is extend the ability for people to defer payments on that until after they die. these are complicated plans. there are a lots of people within the care sector who say that they are not sure that they will address the fundamental difficulties of the system. alison,
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thank you for the moment. taking us through complicated plans on social care. some winners and some losers. quentin lettsjoins me now. we can get his thoughts. we are still waiting for the prime minister. media gathered here... there are some much is at the top, i don't know if you have got them. some neurotic choreography it seems like an old—fashioned neurotic choreography it seems like an old —fashioned manifesto neurotic choreography it seems like an old—fashioned manifesto launch where there intense worrying about whether everything is perfect. the level of detail is quite interesting. so, we are told that she is good to be late already! yes, a p pa re ntly she is good to be late already! yes, apparently the bus broke down! strong and stable bus! she will be arriving and will be surrounded, presumably, by members of the cabinet. they came up on the train, second—class. then we will hear some policy proposals. we have not had this in other manifesto launches. labour had a public sector venue, a university, broad brush in their
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approach. last night, the liberal democrats had a peculiar manifesto launch held in a discotheque! a lot of hearing aids there last night. it was more like a top thumping morale boosting speech by tim farron. this will be a much more methodical event i would expect. and on domestic policy, a lot of people have called it the brexit election. how much detail will we get on brexit policies? they will be important, went they? the conservatives are going in pretty confident but that is important on this manifesto... very little detail on brexit, that is the great unknown. you want data ina is the great unknown. you want data in a manifesto, it is reassuring to have facts and figures, even if we sketch writers don't understand! it is the great unknown, it is open to negotiation. they cannot make
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definite promises on that. in terms of protests that we are seeing, a banner being flung overboard... will the conservative party regret having their launch this far north? they should not do. the spin doctors will be having kittens but this is about politics and this is a marginal seat. you want to fight for a marginal seat. the conservatives will want to take the seat of halifax off labour. this country as a whole, this part of the country, isa a whole, this part of the country, is a big battle ground. this is politics. apparently politicians and journalists, they are the only ones who read the manifesto is... is this an exciting day for you? not true, i don't read them! is it an exciting day and should people be excited about this one in particular? they are important, what is in there can be pushed through the house of lords. and that is key when it comes to brexit? yes, the house of lords will not be altering after this
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election. they are important in terms of setting the broad thrust of a government. and also, they show that people have done some thinking. you know, the eggheads have done what they are meant to be doing. this is the fruit of all of that thinking. lovely. quentin letts, thank you. thinks livening up here a little bit. i don't know if you can see the protests taking place behind me that the prime minister is due here shortly. we don't know what time now, it was initially supposed to get underway at 11:15am but that will not happen now. she has asked the british people to trust her today. we will find out what she intends to do if they choose to do that on june the intends to do if they choose to do that onjune the 8th. much more from us here in west yorkshire to come, anita? today at half past five on bbc news, we will be putting your questions about the conservative party ma nifesto to about the conservative party manifesto to iain duncan smith,
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former cabinet minister and tory party leader. get in touch the usual ways... you can e—mail us as well. the headlines now... prime minister theresa may will shortly launch the conservative ma nifesto shortly launch the conservative manifesto in west yorkshire where she will promise to address the rising cost of social care in england, under plans that will see many more people pay for care in their own home. president trump has said a special cross and —— prosecutor to look into interference in last year ‘s election will find that there is no collusion in his campaign team. the former tv presenter rolf harris is being released on bail from stafford prison tomorrow. the veteran entertainer is currently on trial accused of indecently assaulting three girls between 1971 and 1983. and in sport, a swedish top division
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fixture between gothenberg and aik after an alleged match fixing attempt. it was claimed a aik player was offered considerable sum if he contributed to losing the match tonight. and jose mourinho has asked manchester fans not to kill him for fielding a weaker team this sunday. and five days after saracens lifted the trophy, european professional clu b the trophy, european professional club rugby announces changes to the champions cup qualifying, with no italian club guaranteed a place at the tournament. more stories later. see you then. breaking news from the old bailey where a couple from london who tried to conceal the violent death of their baby daughter by pretending she had died on a busjourney have been sentenced to 11 years in
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prison. rosalind baker and jeffrey will chair from east london, prison. rosalind baker and jeffrey will chairfrom east london, their daughter worse for months old and found to have multiple injuries. richard lister has been covering this case and joins us from the old bailey. richard, a heartbreaking end to the very short life of this little girl? yes. andy reid cap of those events, on september the 28th last year, rosalind baker was caught on cctv boarding a bus near her home in east london with her baby strapped in a baby sling on her chest. the ba by‘s strapped in a baby sling on her chest. the baby's face was covered bya chest. the baby's face was covered by a cloth. as she got onto the bus, her partner, jeffrey wiltshire, gave her partner, jeffrey wiltshire, gave her the thumbs up and waved her. both parents knew that in —— that the child was dead and died in the last 2a hours. she had extensive
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injuries, more than a0 rib fractures, a broken wrist and a fractured skull that almost certainly killed her. thejudge said the only final —— the final part of her life must have been painful and the world touring. in west yorkshire, let's return. we are expecting the launch of the conservative manifesto... anita, hello. the prime minister hasjust arrived. we are seeing a fleet of vehicles pull up here. i can tell you that we are in halifax. we are desperately seeing if we can see the prime minister. you may see some flags above the mill there. protests forming since early this morning. i think theresa may has gone in through that hoddle into the room there. —— huddle. setupfor through that hoddle into the room there. —— huddle. setup for her before the launch of the conservative party manifesto which she will be doing behind schedule
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now, we think. a lot of people have come out to see her, waving flags and protesting against zero hours contracts as well. norman smith, you can talk to us a bit about the choreography of a day like today? she has arrived and gone into that room. i have not seen it yet. what can we expect? it is interesting, there is a sizeable protest here. team may have thought, we can try and reach into traditional labour seats. not as easily as she thinks. some of the trade unions have clearly got well organised. this is labour country. there could be a slight sense of complacency, thinking that the prime minister can breeze in and it will be fine. a lot of people opposed to theresa may. protests on posterity and zero hours contracts. she will be injured used by brexit secretary david davis, who will presumably say that she is the
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one running this —— introduced. forming the core of the campaign message. that i am the one to deliver brexit, i am the leader. we get other parts of the broader theresa may message. she doesn't wa nt theresa may message. she doesn't want to be a prime minister known for only brexit but put down reforms which she believes are necessary and distinctive and long overdue. top of the pile is social care. there is a huge row about the reforms over social care. hugely controversial. conservatives maintain that this is a significant package being put forward. figures by the man brought in to think how we solve social care, not at all impressed, saying that they bottled the big decision oi'i that they bottled the big decision on how you stop people facing huge potential care costs. his view is that they have dodged it. a lot about it about social care packages which will undoubtably rumble on.
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elsewhere, things that strike me as distinctive and how she rips up chunks of the cameron years. gone are the on rocks on pensions and tax, gone is the coalition pledge of free school meals for everyone regardless of income. employers being hit too. surprising for a conservative to be posing more regulation and red tape, and more charges on business. mrs may is saying to businesses, if you want to bring in migrants from outside of the eu, you will have to pay. i suspect that will play well with many people who voted for brexit. businesses are appalled, they say there is a labour shortage in this country and you have two recruit people. you cannot tax as to recruit people. you cannot tax as to recruit people as it is a block on economic growth. you are stopping us from expanding if you are to make charges to bring in people. there are a lot of changes to this which are hugely controversial. who is going to be
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pleased when they read through this? who is this plane to? it's a wide audience but not the traditional tory one that we are used to? no, core tory supporters are going to like it. it still retains fundamental tory narratives. brexit supporters will like it, of course, as mrs may will signal that they are leaving the single market, forget the european court ofjustice, we are out of here! everyone who voted for brexit, and i expect a lot of ukip people will think this is for us. the interesting dynamic is how far theresa may can broaden the traditional tory appeal. can she reach into labour territory? with a package of measures designed to appeal to people who do not usually support the conservative party. people who would normally look to labour to introduce reforms at the workplace to ensure that they have better rights in terms of taking leave to look after sick relatives,
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in terms of the rights of temporary and part—time workers. all of those union issues, she has picked them up and said that she will do that. interestingly, the tuc described her package as promising. i don't think i have ever heard the union movement say a tory party has promising ideas when it comes to this. but that is what theresa may is trying to do, go beyond the tory family and the brexiteers to reach out to new potential tory voters who she believes are disillusioned with what jeremy corbyn has offered. on brexit, the manifesto is hugely important on that issue. even if she does get an increased majority, this ma nifesto does get an increased majority, this manifesto and content on brexit is important in terms of the house of lords moving forward? yes, at the end of the day, what is in the ma nifesto end of the day, what is in the manifesto will almost be irrelevant
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if she cannot deliver brexit. everything is banked on brexit. there is a lot else she wants to do that she cannot deliver brexit she will go down as the prime minister who failed to deliver the result of the referendum. she knows that. what will define the success or failure of the may premiership is brexit. that is why she has staked that from the off of her premiership. with the phrase" brexit means brexit", she recognises that she needs to live up to that. in the manifesto, it will bea to that. in the manifesto, it will be a restatement to an extent of what we know on brexit. no doubt that we will walk away if we do not get the deal on what we want. do not think we are bluffing on this. if you offer us a bad deal, we are leaving anyway, forget it! that is absolutely clear. so far it seems to have enabled mrs may to basically hoover up all of the old ukip
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voters, they were left with one person standing. all of those votes went to the tory party and theresa may has taken a simple line on brexit, we are leaving, come what may, it does not matter. a lot of journalists coming in and out of that room. it looks like things may get underway soon. a word on immigration. you are talking about ukip voters, she wants to scoop up some of those, they will be carefully listening to the restate m e nt carefully listening to the restatement on that pledge. we have heard from them a number of times before? it will be interesting if we get detail, i expect that we went. it will be ambition rather than detail and i say that because immigration is going to form part of the nitty—gritty of the negotiations. with michael barnier. what we will get, i think, is some
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sort of bland words about we want to get migration down to the tens of thousands and take back control, but how? we are not telling you! she wa nts a clea n how? we are not telling you! she wants a clean hand those talks and needs to square her party with whatever she comes up with. we can speculate a lot of suggestions that there may be some sort of work permit and works visa system, controversial but the direction she seems to be going in. i do not think we will know until she produces an immigration bill. she will need to produce that in this parliament. when we get that bill, then, at that moment, i think we will get theresa may's plan for bringing down the numbers. all of which say a lot of people in the tory party remains sceptical about the idea of getting net migration down to the tens of thousands because the tory party had been promising for the last seven yea rs been promising for the last seven years and got pretty much nowhere on it. theresa may was the woman
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supposed to be delivering on it. huge scepticism and the view that she has made it harder by keeping stu d e nts she has made it harder by keeping students in the numbers, people say that students are not the numbers agricultural problems. —— problems. i would not look for too many specifics. as to a master plan in getting down migration numbers but it will be a restatement of broad ambition. still quite rowdy, whittled away in the courtyard but a number people of davitt at the entrance. in the car park, as well. i spoke to some people who are protesting he said, i've come here to protest against theresa may, i want her out. there is quite a feeling against air.|j found what is interesting is that it is very divisive election. the gaps between the parties is frankly larger than i can remember in any recent election. jeremy corbyn is
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doing a distinctive left—wing agenda, massively energises his people, they feel passionately about him. they hyped up. we're seeing some of that today. theresa may, on the other hand, hammering away on brexit. such a divisive issue. many people feel they passionately about it. many people passionately opposed. the business credibly high octane election. there were huge omission is running around. what ever else we can say there will not bea ever else we can say there will not be a calm, placid, rather dull election. it will kick off all over the place. i expect that theresa may's team will be knocked some of the unions found out where the event was, today. and quite a sizeable number of them have got here. not the easiest place to get to and they have got here. they were there as a welcoming committee. that may well be the nature of this election campaign. that is why team may will try to shield her a lot from the general public. she's not done many
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walkabout when she has she ran into some flags, remember cathy gave her a hard time about disability benefits. there will be more of that if theresa may goes walkabout. they might be relaxed about that. thinking she is meeting real people, she might get some broke that she can handle it. it might be happy. given the way they've handled it so far, i think there has been this inclination to do to control. —— she might get some blowback. i think they will pull her back from uncontrolled moments. you only need one moment ago a bit off piste, it is all over social media, it could have an impact. i think they may be tempted to rain back and keep her shielded from that upset. theresa may's team as we are now knowing them seem too is handed out and plant that. i've seen some passed out of the door. # handed out blue pamphlet. that is
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the conservative party manifesto. there it goes. this is a big day for them. we're told that no one in the real world actually read these documents, just people like you and me and politicians. but, this is an important day. it is. it puts down in black—and—white what was previously rhetoric. we moved from the stage just talking about things to formally committing. these are pledges which people expect to be fulfilled and can point to and hold politicians to account on. so, these are very, very significant documents. our is easy to pick holes in them and so the politicians never deliver on them. nevertheless, these are the sort of nuts bolts that guarantee —— the guarantees by which they held to account. when politicians do not deliver on them, it has an impact. i would just trying grab this manifesto.
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a p pa re ntly trying grab this manifesto. apparently one line is that they will negotiated with the eu in a spirit of sincere cooperation. will negotiated with the eu in a spirit of sincere cooperationlj will spirit of sincere cooperation.” will not be to be done as quickly as one might like. our plan for a stronger britain... that is the title? that the title. it is about 80 pages long server is a lot of detail in it. a vast amount. that is what we've heard so far. the only surprise, we were told it would be a stripped down manifesto, but mrs may did not want to be encumbered with endless points and pledges to be tied down in the same way that david cameron and george osborne had these very chunky manifestos. actually, first glance, looks like it is indeed, again, quite a substantial document that she has produced. how tightly it is worded we will have to
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see. but, she has not gone for a very slim and appellate document. see. but, she has not gone for a very slim and appellate documentm is quite substantial. we'll let you go in and have at that. lg go in and have at that. in terms of polls, three weeks to go, bit of a drop in the theresa may.” polls, three weeks to go, bit of a drop in the theresa may. i think we have seen thatjeremy corbyn has i am large solidified the labour vote. he hasn't reached out beyond it, but his very core message on issues around the health service, nationalisation has energised his people. so, the labour vote has strengthened at around 30%. the other parties have fizzled away, the lib dems seem to have stalled, eight 01’ lib dems seem to have stalled, eight or 9%. the great insurgents has not happened. ukip. .. they've or 9%. the great insurgents has not happened. ukip... they've gone to a steep nosedive. so, we now have a
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sort of straight contest between the tories and the labour party, with labour, as they say, showing up the boat. from the stratospheric heights which theresa may initially enjoyed, it inevitably settles down. it be interesting post manifesto, whether that picks up. i'm just being told, actually, just a well i didn't let out what is in this manifesto because it is it in and bar code. i didn't have my glasses to read that. -- it is didn't have my glasses to read that. —— it is still in embargo.” didn't have my glasses to read that. -- it is still in embargo. i think she's going to address the convention on human rights, our relationship there, those things. it will be interesting to see what she has decided to include in that blue pamphlet. most of these manifestos go through pretty much every single department listing all the objectives. the striking thing about this manifesto, i will be interesting to put david cameron's ultimate best on the side of it because i think it would be hugely
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different, not just because i think it would be hugely different, notjust in specific policies but in the tone. david cameron was always a politician he favoured the sunlit uplands sort of vision, pushing people towards aspirational, optimistic, things will get better, slightly like blair. theresa may, is very different fish. she is a sort of, it is going to be difficult, i'm not into dog, the different challenges, the vicars daughter. it is different in tone. —— i am not going to dock. i'm interested to know how that will go down with people, because people often like a bit of sunlight. i wonder if there is not something in the british psyche which actually likes the, "it is not going to be easy" that much more cautious language. maybe it is seen as more realistic, maybe we do not go in but
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the sort of american big vision stuff. that is not really here we are. i think theresa may maybe appeals more to that sort of sentiment. which, is much more cautious about how you can affect things, about change, about the limitations of what is possible, about the scope or really investing vast amounts of money. about the reality of everyday life. i expect it will be a very different tone in this manifesto. the cabinet has now arrived in the hall, they've taken their seats. the one thing we will know at today is we will have labour's manifesto, the tory ma nifesto, labour's manifesto, the tory manifesto, we will never battle lines. we all know how the rest of this campaign will look. we will, and what we know is that it is game to be one of the most divisive elections we have seen. —— what we
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know is that it is going to be. in yea rs know is that it is going to be. in years gone by, the main parties were broadly in the same, sort of, area. now we have a labour party which seems to be looking to a very different vision of britain, a change to our liberal, pro—business, market economy, more expansion in the role of the state, much bigger role for trade unions and very different tilt from what has gone in the past. yet, theresa may as well, different tilt to conventional conservative policies. sqa much of the day become an agenda. deliberately ripping up the symbolic pledges. —— is giving much of the david cameron agenda. for example, david cameron agenda. for example, david cameron agenda. for example, david cameron put the lid on grammar schools to show him detoxifying the tory party. theresa may, knows she will take flak for the that but she
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ta kes a will take flak for the that but she takes a different view and thinks have vision of grammar schools were actually benefit low income families whose kids do not have the advantage of wealthy parents who can send their children to private schools or middle—class parents who move into good catchment zones. so, we end up with two parties almost turning their back on the track record of their back on the track record of the predecessors on what the parties have been about it with the past ten yea rs or have been about it with the past ten years or so. earlier this week we had jeremy corbyn signalling a marked change in direction for the labour party, i would suggest today we're sinking reza make sickening a similar change we're sinking reza make sickening a similarchange in we're sinking reza make sickening a similar change in direction for the tory party. in a few moments david davis. —— we're seeing theresa may making a similar change in the direction for the tory party. let's talk about the nhs, briefly. i might be something on gp contracts, that is something which is being duly
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controversial and has caused her quite a few problems. the unpopularity ofjeremy hunt, the strikes ofjunior doctors. there may be more trouble coming down the way because we know that nurses are now threatening to ballot over industrial action which would be unprecedented. that would be like thejunior doctors unprecedented. that would be like the junior doctors strike on stilts. because, nurses, of course, they will use as angels, no government wa nts to will use as angels, no government wants to get involved in a class with them. —— they are viewed as angels. in terms of the nhs, we got angels. in terms of the nhs, we got a clear signalfrom angels. in terms of the nhs, we got a clear signal from jeremy hunt that there would be more money for the nhs. to now, we were told there was no more money in the budget, we were told there was no blank cheque for the nhs. now, jeremy hunt says there will be more money and we will go farther than a pledge to protect the nhs budget. what is interesting is how are they responding to the pressures on ana, and waiting time,
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how far they are responding to jeremy corbyn's promising 7 billion more for the nhs and the liberal democrats saying, we will put a penny on income axing of six plainmoor. —— and give the nhs 6 billion more. theresa may has the —— there was a view that theresa may does not get the nhs. david cameron said that nhs were the three letters that mattered to him the most. he understand that the nhs was such an emotive issue for many people in this country. theresa may has never really got back in the same sort of way. she's never gone in for talking in molecule in times about the health service, in fact she's been quite clunking in her language when talking about it, when pressed by jeremy corbyn on it. but, we have learned there will be more money on the health service, how much more we do not know. if there is going to be
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a big rise, there was some suggestion could be up to 8 billion for the nhs, suggestion could be up to 8 billion forthe nhs, i suggestion could be up to 8 billion for the nhs, i will have to check out whether that is true because it's advocate huge amount of money thatis it's advocate huge amount of money that is the case. i have been given the thumbs up on that figure. i'm seeing rudimentary sign language. a p pa re ntly seeing rudimentary sign language. apparently 8 billion more for the nhs. if that is the case that is trumping jeremy corbyn and the liberal democrats. i would like to know whether money is coming from, because that is a humongous injection of cash and i wonder that includes any existing funding schemes. but, if she can pull off an 8 billion for the nhs i think she will be thinking,, the end of her ma nifesto will be thinking,, the end of her manifesto launch, that will be the top line. we will perhaps have moved on from the rows about social care and this owning the come on legacy and this owning the come on legacy and we will say, my goodness, theresa may is going to pour billions into the health service. i have to see how she's getting pull off blizzard she's going to get rid off blizzard she's going to get rid of the death to any time soon that
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will not help. —— i have to see how she's going to pull that off because if she's going to get rid of the deficit any tension that will not help. i'm been told that you a # i'm being told you that there will not be any scottish referendum until after the brexit., but i'm hearing they are now starting. family listen to what is happening inside the hall?l stronger economy, a fairer society, a global britain. but, all that depends on getting the right brexit deal. for that, we need strong and sta ble deal. for that, we need strong and stable leadership. the negotiations we are about to begin with the european union will not be easy. they will be challenging. at times, ill be tough. in theresa may,
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britain has a prime minister with the strength to lead britain with these negotiations make a success of these negotiations make a success of the future. for all that you only need to look at how record. as home secretary, reforming the police, cutting crime, protecting our borders and deporting... as prime minister setting out a clear vision for a new relationship with europe. leading a country strength and purpose and tackling the burning injustices that hold too many people back. she has a clear plan brexit and fora back. she has a clear plan brexit and for a better future for our country. and she has the strength and ability needed to see that plan through. ladies and gentlemen please welcome the prime minister, theresa. applause thank you. to day, as we face this
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critical election for our country, i launched my manifesto for britain's future. and manifesto to see us through brexit and beyond. a plan for a stronger, fairer, more prosperous britain. a plan to seize the opportunities ahead and to build a country that our children and grandchildren are proud to cool home. it is a detailed programme for government rooted in the hopes and aspirations of ordinary working people across the land. but it is
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more than that, it is a vision for britain, a portrait of the kind of country i want this nature and to be after brexit, as we chart our own way in the world. for at this defining moment for the united kingdom, as we embark on this momentous journey kingdom, as we embark on this momentousjourney for kingdom, as we embark on this momentous journey for our nation, we have a chance to step back and ask ourselves, what kind of country we wa nt to ourselves, what kind of country we want to build together. i believe that our united kingdom, merge from this period of national change stronger, fairer and more prosperous than ever before. i believe we can bea than ever before. i believe we can be a country that stands tall in the world and provides leadership on some of the greatest challenges of our time. and, some of the greatest challenges of ourtime. and, i believe some of the greatest challenges of our time. and, i believe we can and must take this opportunity to build a great meritocracy here in britain. let me be clear about what that
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means, it means making britain a country where everyone, of whatever background, has the chance to go as far as the talent and the hard work will take them. a country that asks not where you have come from but where you are going to. it means making britain a country that works not for the privileged few but that everyone. a country where it does not matter where you are born, your pa rents not matter where you are born, your parents work, where you went to school, what your accent sounds like, whether you're a man or woman, 93v like, whether you're a man or woman, gay or straight or black or white. a country in which all that matters is the talent you have and how hard you are prepared to work. that is the kind of britain i want others to build together. because, as we leave the european union and set ourselves ona the european union and set ourselves on a new course we need to make the
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most of all the talent in this country. for britain to succeed we need to lease the ability of every person, harnessed the creativity of every business, support the ambition and on to pin your realism of every sector. we need to improve the opportunities performers and believe in britain and the enjoying power of the british spirit. and we need to look forward, not back. believing that despite great heritage we have an even greater future and that we can build that brighter future together. letters be in no doubt, it will not be easy. there will be obstacles will not be easy. there will be o bsta cles in will not be easy. there will be obstacles in way, there will be some who wishes to fall short, others who wish to hold us back. many who will others to fail. but, with discipline and focus, effort and hard work and above all a unity of purpose
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stretching across this precious union of nations from north to south and east to west, i believe we can and east to west, i believe we can and must go forward together. to do that we need a new contract between government and people. we need a government and people. we need a government that is strong enough to act and humble enough to listen. responsible enough to people's needs and stable enough to get on with the job and deliver. and we need to unite behind a clear plan to make the most of the opportunities ahead. that is what this manifesto offers, clear plan to meet the baked challenges we face together. a credible, deliverable programme for government around which the country can unite. a plan that, unlike the offerings of other parties, is upfront and honest about the scale of the pask we face. what we say in
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it we will do and the scale of our ambition is clear. —— with the scale of the pask we face. it is the responsibility of leadership to be upfront and straight with people about the town dues are head. about the difficult decisions and trade—offs that need to be made. and the hard work required to overcome the hard work required to overcome the obstacles in our way. and that is what this manifesto does. it identifies the five great giant challenges that we face as a country. one, the need for a strong economy, too, responding to brexit and a changing world three,, tackling enjoying social divisions, four, responding to an ageing society, and five, facing up to fast changing technology. it sets out
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what we would do to address each one. and in doing so it offers a vision of britain, notjust for the next five years but for the years and decades ahead. a stronger britain where everyone has the economic security they need and the chance to live a secure and full life. a more prosperous britain where each generation can do better than the last. but, all of this depends on getting the next five yea rs depends on getting the next five years right. make no mistake, the central challenge we face is negotiating the breast deal the britain in europe. asthma croaked the best deal for britain britain in europe. asthma croaked the best dealfor britain in europe. but asthma croaked the best deal for britain in europe. each and every one depends on having this strongest possible and as we entered negotiations in order to get the best brexit deal the families across this country, if we fail the
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consequences for britain and for the economic security of ordinary working people will be dire. if we succeed, the opportunities ahead of those are great. i have negotiated the britain in europe and i know that the best place to start is to be clear about where you stand on what you want. that is why i have been clear that we do not seek to forge this issue, to be half in and half out of the. the british people made their choice, i respect that. i respect the view of the other european leaders who agree that we cannot be half and half out either. so, we will leave the european union and take control of our money, our borders, our laws. we will forge a new deep and special partnership with europe and reach out beyond europe to strike new trade deals for
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our goods and services with old allies and new friends around the world, as well. we will make the decisions that matter to britain here in britain. we will be a great global trading nation that stands tall in the world once again. and, if we get brexit right we can use this moment of change to build a stronger, fairer, more prosperous britain here at home. that is the real prize, the goal to which we must work. the cars, the too many people in britain today, life is simply much harder than many seem to think all realise. they are not ideological, they don't buy into grand visions, they'll full by politicians who promise the earth and claim no tough choices are required, they make those choices every day in their own lives and understand that politicians who aspire to lead must do the same. they do not ask for much, theyjust
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wa nt to they do not ask for much, theyjust want to get on with their lives, to do the best for their children and to be given a fair chance. they look to be given a fair chance. they look to the government the help and support. this party, the conservative and unionist party will be that government. for while it is never true that the government has all the answers, government put squarely at the service of ordinary working people can, and should be a force for good. a force that steps up force for good. a force that steps up and ask in the interests of ordinary working people, but does not ignore them and walk on by on the other side but serves the interest of the mainstream of the british public. with the right brexit deal secured my mainstream government will deliver for mainstream britain. all those who work hard and make this country what it is, people who have a job but don't always have job security, people you own a home but worry about paying the mortgage, people
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who can just about manage but worry about the cost of living and getting their children into a good school. and that is why the government i lead will ensure that every area of this united kingdom is able to prosper with a modern industrial strategy to spread opportunity across the whole country. why the government i leave will build the britain in which work pays with a higher national living wage and proper rights and protections at work, why the government i lead will keep taxes low, and cap rip—off energy paris to help families were working all the hours they can to pay the bills. white we will help those struggling to afford a home of their own. it is why the government i lead will build a britain in which the economy is strong to support world —class the economy is strong to support world—class public services with the most ambitious programme of investment in technology and buildings that the nhs has ever seen. record and fair funding
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buildings that the nhs has ever seen. record and fairfunding is buildings that the nhs has ever seen. record and fair funding is the schools, real technical education for young people and the first ever proper plan to pay for and provide social care. because strong public services do not just social care. because strong public services do notjust provide security and enhance opportunity, they are vital, local and national ins to gins that bring us all together and it is why the government i lead will be relentless in tackling burning injustices. like discrimination on the basis of race, gender, mental health or disability. injustices the scar on the soul of our nation and i will fight it where ever it is spam. so, for example, we will introduce the first new mental health bill for 30 years, to put parity of esteem at the heart of treatment and end the stigma of mental illness once and for all. but, most important of all, the
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government i lead will provide strong and stable leadership to see us through brexit and beyond. tackling the long—term challenges we face and ensuring everyone in our country has the chance to get on in life. we need that strong and stable leadership now, more than ever. for the next five years will be among the next five years will be among the most challenging in our lifetime. a defining period for our nation, a turning point for britain that will determine the kind of country we are and the kind of future generations that come after others will see. that is why, now more than ever, britain need strong and stable government, why now more than ever britain need strong leadership to make the most of the opportunities brexit will bring, now more than ever britain needs more
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clear plan and determination and will to see it through and it is why in this election more than in any before it is time to put the old tribal politics behind ours and to come together in the national interest united in our desire to make a success of brexit, united in our desire to get the right result but britain, because every vote for me and my team in this election will strengthen my hand in the negotiations to come, every vote for me and my team will be about to get on with the vote of —— get on with thejob of on with the vote of —— get on with the job of delivering brexit and delivering a stronger and more secure future for all. it will be a vote for a stronger, fairer more prosperous britain and after all thatis prosperous britain and after all that is passed that is a vision of the future that can bring us together. so, i offer myself as your
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prime minister with a resolute determination to get on with the job of delivering brexit, optimism that ican get of delivering brexit, optimism that i can get a deal that works for all and confident in the belief that we have division, the plan and the will to use this moment to build a better britain. with the right deal for britain. with the right deal for britain abroad, taking back control of our borders, money and laws and a better deal ordinary working people at home. a modern industrial strategy to spread prosperity and opportunity around the country exploiting the opportunities of technology to attract the jobs of the future to britain, relieve an family energy bills and the cost of living, more secure well—paid jobs and new protections for workers. the chance to own a home and more affordable housing, a good school place for every child, with more
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money for schools every year, is stronger economy to fund our nhs and give you the security you need, a stronger, fairer, more prosperous britain that works for everyone not just a privileged few, that is the gold, that is the plan and now is the time. so, join me on this journey come with me as i lead britain, strengthen my hand as i like the britain and stand with me asi like the britain and stand with me as i deliverfor britain. with confidence in ourselves and the unity of purpose in our country letters all go forwards together. applause
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thank you. now, i apologise because i see the media at the back of the room. laura? thank you, prime minister. you are ditching much of the manifesto that you and your party stood onjust manifesto that you and your party stood on just two years ago. more families, including traditional tory voters, will need to pay more for elderly care. many families will
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lose hot meals for their children at school, just at a time when people are feeling the pinch. you are pushing back balancing the books again. and your immigration proposals may cost billions to the economy. when you put that altogether, with some voters be quite entitled to conclude that adds up quite entitled to conclude that adds up to quite a bleak picture that you are putting forward ? up to quite a bleak picture that you are putting forward? no, not at all. iam are putting forward? no, not at all. i am fitting forward a vision for opportunity and prosperity across the whole of the country for the future. i have been clear that there some hard choices that need to be taken but that is what strong and sta ble taken but that is what strong and stable government, and leadership, is about. making sure that we are honest with the public about the ha rd honest with the public about the hard choices. if you look at what we are doing, the first time ever, a proper long—term plan for social care, to ensure that there is dignity in old age. a plan that is fair across the generations. ensuring that we are putting more money into our schools and giving every primary school child a
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brea kfast every primary school child a breakfast before they start their school day, to set the school day off well. ensuring that we are putting more money into our nhs, as the biggest ever investment in technology in buildings in our national health service. but you can only do that if you have a strong economy and having that strong economy and having that strong economy is central to what we, as conservatives, do in government. to do that, we also need to make sure we get the brexit negotiations right. having that right leadership to ta ke right. having that right leadership to take us in with a strong hand in the negotiations is so important and thatis the negotiations is so important and that is why i say every vote for me and my team will strengthen my hand in brexit negotiations, to get the best dealfor britain. in brexit negotiations, to get the best deal for britain. did in brexit negotiations, to get the best dealfor britain. did i see fires on in the manifesto on page 36, you repeat that you continue to believe that no deal is better than a bad dealfor the uk. is
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that no deal is better than a bad deal for the uk. is this document a mandate for no deal? are voters who vote for you accepting that a possibility within the five years is that there could be no deal? is that not the definition of potential chaos? this manifesto is a mandate and this election, i want to give a mandate by strong hand in negotiations to give the best possible deal to the uk and the best possible deal to the uk and the best possible deal to the uk and the best possible dealfor possible deal to the uk and the best possible deal for every part of the united kingdom. to do that we need a strong hand in negotiations and that is why, as ijust said, every vote for me and my team is one that will strengthen my hand in brexit negotiations. we want the best deal for britain and one that works for every pa rt for britain and one that works for every part of the uk, that is what we are determined to do. did i see andy bell? thank you. andy bell, channel five news. do you accept and your social care plan that the majority of people currently
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receiving care in their own homes will end up worse off and do your plan? and isn't it seemed to matter of much of the manifesto that you are turning your back on the traditional middle england which has put the conservatives in power? at this election you think you can find votes elsewhere? this is the first time we have seen a proper and long—term plan for sustainability of social care in this country. one of the great challenges we face with an ageing population and it is right that anyone who wants to be prime minister or party that wants to be in government faces that challenge and sets it out clearly for people. what will we see as a result of proposals that we are making? that those elderly people who have been worried about how they pay for care in their home will not have to worry about it in future. they will not have to pay while they are still alive, nothing will be paid and they will not to sell their home while they have been living in it. we also see that those people are worried
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that their savings are going to have done the right thing and saved through their lives, and are worried that savings will dwindle to nothing, they are quadrupling the threshold at which assets will be protected to £100,000. what else do i expect to see from this? action and improvement in the quality of social care that is available for people. i expect people to be able to stay in their own homes for longer, which will mean less pressure on the nhs. i think i saw gary in front of you? thank you. you said you wanted to be straight, and cani said you wanted to be straight, and can i ask you, in the previous question, everybody says there is a cost to getting net migration down, and economic cost. had you costed it, is it in the billions? throughout the manifesto you have said you want to close in justice gaps. isn't there a danger that you are creating a whole new one between children of slightly better off pa rents children of slightly better off parents who may be dire behalf to
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tack or are treated for certain types of medical conditions? and is likely better off children of those with dementia? it likely better off children of those with dementia ? it looks likely better off children of those with dementia? it looks like they get different treatment and a theresa may government in these plans. and throughout the manifesto you seem to have given business quite a hard time. energy companies with big names that have slightly conned their customers. house—builders have been building pretty grotty houses, you say. do you think the conservatives, over the years, have got too cosy with business? has business been too greedy? you put quite a few issues in that question, i have to say, gary! that's rather more than the one question most people are asking. on the immigration issue, it is right that we want to bring net migration to sustainable levels. those are in the tens of thousands because of the impact that uncontrolled migration has on
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people, especially at the low end of the income scale because it can hold down people's wages and mean displacement ofjobs. also, it puts pressure on public services. what we are saying is that yes, we want to increase the immigration skills charge because that money can be put into ensuring that people here are trade up —— trained up to take the jobs. i want to see people here having the skills to take on the jobs while we have a system that brings the brightest and the best into the uk. that is what we will be doing. in terms of the question of business, we absolutely clearly set out in this manifesto the key thing that we want to do for business, which is to ensure we have a strong economy, and we want to be the best place for businesses to be set up and grow, and provide thosejobs and investments here in the uk. but, we
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do believe, in responsible business, if you talk to business people they will also say it is better to have an engaged workforce that is content, increasing productivity. that is right to say that we ensure that workers have proper protections, but we also want to ensure that we have an economic framework where business creates jobs. since 2010, two .9 million jobs. since 2010, two .9 million jobs have been created. we have seen employment at record levels. higher thanit employment at record levels. higher than it has been since recordsbegan. and lower in the 1970s. that is what a strong economic and do and we need to build on it for the future. did icl bc, is. are you try to redefine what it means to be conservative? and your critics on social care who say you may be in permitting a death tax, what would be your reasoning to
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them to tell and that it is not a death tax? what we are proposing on social care is the first—ever proper plan to ensure sustainability of social care. this is a real challenge that faces us. this challenge that faces us. this challenge has been ducked by governments for too long. we are prepared to stand up to that challenge, and put forward this plan which is, as i say, will protect higher levels of assets than currently protected for individuals. we will need to take away the worry from people as to how they will pay for their care and whether savings are going to be depleted to virtually nothing. and lead to an improvement in social care. what we believe in is ensuring that we are providing a system that provides people with dignity in their old age, but doing so in a way that is fair across the generations. i think the guardian newspaper is here, it is heather here? i think a
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microphone is coming to you... hello, so you are going to means test the future fuel —— the winter fuel allowance. and wealthy pensioners are going to have to pay more for their care, including care at home? you talked about being upfront on the challenges, are you being upfront with older people, pensioners, that have done well in the last decade or so, now they need to bear more costs of the fairer society that you are talking about? if you look in the manifesto, when we set out what we are doing in relations to the pensions triple lock, we make the point it was introduced at a time and there were significant disparities in relation to pensioners incomes. now, as a result of the changes that have been made, in relation to the basic state pension, an increase of £1250 per year. some older people worry that there is a disparity for the younger generation, and will they be better
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off in the future? pensions will continue to go up and a conservative government, we will have a double lock, which would ensure pensions go up lock, which would ensure pensions go up either at the rate of average earnings or inflation, whichever is higher. so, pensioners will continue to be protected against rising prices. but i do think it is important that we ensure that changes that we bring in our changes that are fair across the generations. tom? prime minister, tom newton dunn from the sun newspaper. you are taking money from rich pensioners and giving it to youngerfamilies, rich pensioners and giving it to younger families, delighting in using the power of big government to rip—off businesses, it is the sort of stuff that might horrify some of your cabinet sitting in front of you privately. do you accept that you are moving to the political centre ground and are you proud of your new
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moniker, red tory? the conservative party has always been on centre ground, we believe in managing the economy carefully. we believe in spending taxpayers money responsibly. we believe in encouraging business and investment that can create good and high—paid jobs. we want to see good school places for every child, so young people get the best possible start in life. we want to ensure we have the yukon fund the support in public services. these are all good principles which have underpinned conservatism and continue to underpin conservatism. but crucially we wa nt underpin conservatism. but crucially we want to give people opportunity. we wa nt we want to give people opportunity. we want to encourage aspiration and in britain, under the conservative government, we want to know how far you go in life depends on you, your talents and hard work, not where you came from. applause did i see jason from the daily mail
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there? jason graves from the daily mail. you put leaving the single market in your manifesto, would you expect those in your party, and the house of lords, to oppose that? and may i ask, in the theme of the day, do you consider yourself a thatcher—ite? on the single market, we want a competitive free trade agreement with the eu which is about having good, tariff free and frictionless access to the single market. but you
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cannot be a member of the single market without effectively being a member of the eu, and the british people have been clear that we will leave the eu. we will be leaving the eu but will be negotiating the best deal that we can. there are other areas we want to continue to operate and cooperate with the ee on issues like security, justice and home affairs. on trade we want a compact of free trade agreement that is going to be good for businesses here in the uk. and, good forjobs and ordinary working families here in the uk. margaret thatcher was conservative, i am a conservative. this is a conservative manifesto. applause i think i saw ben? thank you, then glaze from the daily mirror. you were elected in 2010 and 2015 on a
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promise to the tens of thousands, your home secretary between 2010 and 2016, you did not meet that pledge. why should people believe that today? you're right i was working on this, figures were down and went up again and have come down again. there is no singleton you can do in relation to net migration figures which is going to make all the difference. we need to be working on this issue constantly. of course, what we will have when we leave the eu is the ability to put rules in for that part of the migration system which we have not had the opportunity to control before, like people coming from the eu into the uk. i explained earlier why i think it is important net migration needs to be at sustainable levels, as uncontrolled immigration has an impact on public services, people, and people at the lower end of the income scale, in depressing wages,
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and sometimes in disposing jobs. that is why i think it is important we maintain commitment and continue to work on it. one had just went up at the back there... ? to work on it. one had just went up at the back there...? sorry, i cannot see... i wanted to ask what the manifesto tells us about you personally and your political philosophy? i think it tells me that iama philosophy? i think it tells me that i am a good conservative! and it tells you that i believe in ensuring we have a strong economy and good public services funded from a strong economy, and have opportunities for all. crucially, ithink economy, and have opportunities for all. crucially, i think that is the important thing. i want to see britain as a global britain standing tall in the world and trading around the world, taking our place and a briton where people in this country know how far they go depends on them and their hard work and talents. was that paul isil?
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—— was that paul that i saw? -- was that paul that i saw? halifax voted 55% to leave. like many labour seats you target in this election, isn't it the case that when you win those seats, new mps and voters who wa nt to those seats, new mps and voters who want to hold your feet to the fire to get a firm brexit, in that case, isn't david cameron deluded to think that the greater your majority, the greater the chance of a soft brexit? i don't talk in terms of a hard brexit or soft brexit, i want the right dealfor brexit or soft brexit, i want the right deal for britain. applause that is what we are going to do. i don't know if we can get a microphone up the front, to nick? sorry, gordon. you'd been asked
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repeatedly throughout the campaign about taxes on high earners. you've a lwa ys about taxes on high earners. you've always answered to wait until the ma nifesto. always answered to wait until the manifesto. the manifesto does not really have any detail about what tax increases higher earners may face, nor whether they may face increases in national insurance. you are asking higher earners to vote for you without knowing what kind of tax rates they may be paying. what would you say to them now, that the ma nifesto would you say to them now, that the manifesto is out? and it does not tell them what they will be paying in tax? what i would say to earners across the board is that when they come to vote in the election, they have a very clear choice. that clear choice is between a conservative party, which always has been and will be a low tax party, whose intention in government is to reduce taxes on businesses and working families. and a labour party whose natural instinct is to increase taxes. what we saw from the labour ma nifesto taxes. what we saw from the labour manifesto with costings that did not appear to be worth the paper they
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we re appear to be worth the paper they were written on, is that it is ordinary working families paying the price of labour. they pay through higher taxes and low wages. and higher taxes and low wages. and higher prices and fewerjobs. ordinary working people will pay the price of labour. my last question? just picking up onjason groves's questions, it is occasionally said that it questions, it is occasionally said thatitis questions, it is occasionally said that it is difficult to define what is meant by may—ism, but on page nine of your manifesto it says that you reject the cult of selfish individualism and regard dogma and ideology as dangerous. it sounds like the rejection of thatcherism. is may—ism a rejection of thatcherism and are you rejecting the many comparisons between you and margaret thatcher? there is no may—ism, i know that you journalists like to write about it! there is
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good and solid conservatism, which puts the interests of the country at the heart of everything that we do in government. thank you. so, theresa may there having launched the conservative party manifesto. the chancellor, borisjohnson, there, we have not seen much of him so far in this election campaign. amber rudd, home secretary, all in attendance. here it is, the new conservative manifesto. the slogan there inaudible the home secretary, all in
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attendance. the new conservative, if she is elected on the 8th ofjune. a lot of detail but much more to come, all of those journalists use or assembled in the room will be reading through this furiously. —— that you just saw. more reaction through the afternoon. this was a pitch to ordinary families. rules on executive pay and a good focus on generational fairness. executive pay and a good focus on generationalfairness. she talks about a generationalfairness. she talks aboutafair generationalfairness. she talks about a fair society and their worldly —— there will be losers when it comes to that. the triple lock for pensioners will go, and a number of conservative party policies under david cameron have now gone. this was, really, a nod to less the aspirational classes but more those people who were just getting by. we also heard that there will be no scottish referendum after brexit and things we are expecting as well, a
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ban on grammar schools to be lifted, we had some policies on education, and a great focus on social care. she talked ahead of this manifesto launch about a long—term solution. she has said that people's wealth that they generated will now be more protected, it was just under £25,000 that will be protected when it comes to the cost of paying for care in later life which has now risen to £100,000. but with the average cost ofa £100,000. but with the average cost of a house in england at £215,000, some criticism on that policy where many people hoping to passing their houses onto their children will still not be able to do that. we have heard from the funding commission this morning that they think this is disappointing. any pensioners will be disappointed by that policy. other losers will be businesses. there will be new taxes
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and charges, restrictions on bringing in labour from and charges, restrictions on bringing in labourfrom abroad. a nod there to people who voted for brexit when they looked at immigration, it seems that she prioritised that over businesses. so, a refashioning of many of the conservative party policies. and great appeal to a wide audience, but looking to those families she has talked so much about, people just getting by. we will have much more reaction and analysis of those policies and reaction to it. theresa may asking the british people to trust her on the 8th ofjune. now, much more detail in this pamphlet about what she would do with that trust if the voters choose to give it to her. studio: sophie, thank you for that. sophie long in halifax. let me also tell you if you have questions on the manifesto, today at 5:30pm on bbc news we will put those questions to iain duncan smith, the former cabinet minister and former
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tory party leader. you can get in touch via twitter using b hashtag, or text questions to this number. you can also e—mail us. let's ta ke let's take a look at one of the day's other main stories. after a week of sensational revelations, the us government has appointed a special counsel to investigate alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election, as well as alleged collusion between mr trump's campaign and moscow. he's former fbi chief robert mueller, the predecessor of james comey who was fired by president trump this week, sparking an outcry in washington. mr trump strongly denies any suggestion that russia played a role in his victory. from washington here's laura bicker. do you swear that the testimony you are about to give... this is the man now in charge of investigating whether donald trump's election victory was aided by the russians.
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robert muller, director of the fbi for 12 years under presidents bush and obama. his appointment will ease democrats demands for an independent enquiry. and even republicans seems to breathe a little easier... it is a very positive development, evidence the administration is taking this seriously. good news. a man of integrity and enjoys bipartisan support and respect. he's the right man for the job.” bipartisan support and respect. he's the right man for the job. i do not believe it was necessary. they can go off on their own. having said that, i have a lot of confidence in him. if there has to be special counsel they made an excellent choice. donald trump issued a statement instead of his now customary tweet saying the following... but the problems for the president are mounting. the sacked fbi director, james comey, allegedly kept detailed notes of his meetings with mrtrump, including
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kept detailed notes of his meetings with mr trump, including one involving an enquiry into the sacked national security advisor, michael flynn ‘s, relationship with russia. it is reported that trump said... the white house said that this account of the conversation is wrong, but it is the most serious charge yet against the president. it comes in the same to motorist week that mr trump was accused of divulges highly classified intelligence to the russians. congress has said its own enquiries will continue, but many have concerns those findings will be marred by partisan politics. both sides, so far, say they have their faith in this man. that is the hope of the department ofjustice. but after months of claim and cou ntercla i m after months of claim and counterclaim in this long—running political saga, the outcome of any investigation, wherever it may lead, is believed and accepted. laura bicker, bbc news, washington. many gp surgeries across the uk are on the "brink of collapse"
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because of underfunding and staff shortages, according to the doctors' union. the chair of the british medical association's gp committee will use a speech in edinburgh to accuse politicians of a "callous disregard of the health needs of citizens", as our health correspondent jane dreaper reports. individual gp practices have become frighteningly vulnerable according to their union. the bma says that doctors are facing an avalanche of work which is piling up and that all parts of the uk have struggled to recruit sufficient numbers of gps. leaders of the uk's 51,000 family doctors are calling on the next government to increase nhs funding and give general practice a bigger share of it. the gp service is precious and overstretched. it needs to be used responsibly but more than anything else you need the resources to be able to provide a proper health service if proper health you are to try and deliver the aims of any civilised nation. health ministers in all parts
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of the uk have run programmes to recruit more gps and nhs england announced a funding plan to support general practice a year ago. but the bma say there have been delays and in that money reaching some areas. it says patients can play their part as well by using services responsibly. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather. i very good afternoon we had some particularly dry weather in recent weeks. some others saw particularly what weather yesterday. today, neither wet or completely dry. it is turning into a day of sunny spells and showers the many. let's look at the satellite picture, plenty of clear sky but some blobs of clouds developing typically open the north—west. generally cloudy across the far south—east. things will cloud over this afternoon, here. a
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few scratches of rain particularly in spots of spots of east of london. elsewhere, sunny. some showers will be heavy and sundry particularly up to the far north—west. through this evening and tonight we will see some wet weather across south—east england, east anglia, maybe lincolnshire. some uncertainty about how far west the road will get. further west that showers paid and we will see some cold ant ground bust. wayne will scrape across east of england. —— brain will scrape across the east of england. heavy showers, 1560 degrees. —— 15 or 16 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines... theresa may launches the conservatives general election manifesto, describing it as "a plan for a stronger, fairer, more prosperous britain". the manifesto says says no—one will have to sell their property
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in their lifetime to fund residential or home care, but the cost can be partially re—couped from their estate afetr estate afetr they die. that first time ever a proper plan, a long term plan for social care to ensure that old people have dignity in old age but a plan that is fair across the generations. the us government has appointed former fbi chief robert mueller to be special counsel to investigate alleged russian interference in last year's presidential election. according to the doctors union many gps surgeries are on the brink of collapse. let's return to the conservative manifesto launch now and get a snap judgment on the plans put forward by the conservatives. let's be to pauljohnson hejoins us
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from central london studio. thank you i know you have not had a great deal of time to bed just what is in the manifesto, first thought? this ma nifesto the manifesto, first thought? this manifesto sets out some choices, we have got, for example, extra funding the social care, but at the cost of the social care, but at the cost of the juicing the social care, but at the cost of thejuicing winterfuel the social care, but at the cost of the juicing winter fuel allowance for pensioners. we have the promise of breakfast club for primary school children but that the cost of stopping free school meals for five, six and seven—year—olds. on the holder aren't big radical changes in here. we have a fiscal wall which is the same that we had before. but thatis the same that we had before. but that is not until 2025 which gives a lot of wiggle room over the next few yea rs lot of wiggle room over the next few years as lot of wiggle room over the next few yea rs as we lot of wiggle room over the next few years as we through the months. i did not find anything in here which took me quickly by surprise. the last thing i would say, on the health service, it matches what
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labour was promising in terms of funding. how much do you think the emphasis on social care might ease theissues emphasis on social care might ease the issues with the nhs? well, i do not think there is a lot more here the social care and certainly for those who are going into long—term care, a lot of whether pressure on the nhs comes from, what this is really talking about is the juicing a bit of the imam the individuals have to pay for deciding a bit more from the state. —— talking about reducing a bit what individuals happy to pay. philip hammond allocated a lot of additional funding for social care so this ma nifesto funding for social care so this manifesto is ill do on what we saw in the budget which followed some really sharp reductions in the amount of money available. migration the manifesto is looking at firms paying more to hire migrant workers from outside the eu. hal is back in to get down with industry given that
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productivity levels in the economy at the moment and not with the government would want them to be. think this is clearly an additional cost on employers and the economy, actually, if you have significantly lower levels of immigration which the manifesto is still asking for, then that costs ask because immigrants on the whole young and work unpaid tax and do not consume so much in public services, so the cost on the public server side and it cost industry if you increase the red tape burden and indeed the price burden in terms of getting the people what they really want. there is clearly other reasons, political reasons, social reasons why you might want to control immigration but there is an economic cost to much typing alli tighter controls it is that is what this tent into. —— and economic cost too much tighter
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controls. comparing it to other ma nifesto controls. comparing it to other manifesto launches is it possible to say that one party more than another seems to have a cogent plan for how they will pay the pledges and promises? the big difference is the scale of the pledges and promises, if you look at this manifesto, whilst the recent and absolute promise not to increase income tax and national insurance, and so on. you have a modest set of proposals which probably will not require terribly much in the way of tax increases, whilst if you look at the labour party set of proposals they have costed out the spending increases at a pretty big 75 karim pounds. —— 75 william pounds. a very big number in deed and they have promised an additional £50 billion of tax rises. the big difference here is from the labour party you have got a much bigger state, much
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more spending, much more attacks. what you have in the conservative ma nifesto what you have in the conservative manifesto is much more small c conservative. there was not a lot more spending or tax. the big caveat, no one knows the complete and full cost of brexit. absolutely. it does say in here that the fiscal sta nce it does say in here that the fiscal stance is taking into account of that. we now have got eight years to get from where we are to budget balance, that might not be too difficult. one of the risks were talking about very big changes in tax and spending that we do not quite know where the economy will be in two of three years' time. that, we should remember, is a risk that sits across all of these manifestos. in may ten out that none is deliverable of the economy does not move forward. thank you very much, director of the institute for fiscal studies, pauljohnson. let's more reaction on the manifesto. former cabinet minister michael gove is in our westminster studio now.
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is this a really big break from the cameron years? and move away from appealing to your traditional voters ? appealing to your traditional voters? it is certainly the case that this is the manifesto that is pitched to the concerns of ordinary working families. it is a brave document. it stresses that we need to tackle some long—term challenges and in so doing theresa may has made some courageous and principled decisions. she has said that we can no longer afford to have universal provision of winterfuel no longer afford to have universal provision of winter fuel payments for pensioners and those wealthy pensioners who are benefiting from that benefit will have to lose some of it in order to ensure that people who are the poorer end of the spectrum can have the social care paid for. i think that approach, one nation approach is in the best traditions of the conservative party. so when theresa may says there were trade—offs to be made,
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what, as you see it, are the key trade—offs in this manifesto? what, as you see it, are the key trade-offs in this manifesto? one of them is the way in which the first time the whole question of social ca re time the whole question of social care has been grasped authoritatively and some people will have to pay a bit more to ensure that we have a long—term approach toward social care that safeguards everyone. the other thing is the decision to move away from universal free school meals for infants, that will save hundreds of millions of pounds that money will be spent ensuring that every school has as funding changes has its funding protected own hands. sir andrew deal on does not think the manifesto has a grasp of tackling social care, does he? he says it shows a lack of understanding of the issues at the heart of it. there was more than one way to tackle this problem and the approach that sir andrew put forward was, ican approach that sir andrew put forward was, i can understand attractive to some but what this approach manages to do is to ensure that individuals
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will always have up to a hundred thousand pounds worth of the value of the home protected, that is four times the level of protection that is in place at the moment. that will provide people with a greater degree of peace of mind. will regional things come into play, the levels that people have to pay for care in the lab full alli in their own homes? what was the case in the past was that the value of the home was not factored in, it was income and savings. i think it is further this way to ensure that whatever the value of someone's home that they have the resorts of knowing that hundred thousand pounds of it will be protected which provides a degree of peace of mind but it is also the ensure the individuals who are living at home and who need care, they have the resources to contribute to that they should do because one of the big challenges
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that theresa may has set herself is making sure that there was fairness between generations and me to make sure that we do not unnecessarily budding young people and that those who have a keen related sums that can pay something towards the cost of the care should do so. —— unnecessarily heard in young people. crucially do you think these proposals on social care will go a nyway towards proposals on social care will go anyway towards easing the pressure is on the nhs more generally, the list unless the focus on those in the manifesto? i think our commitment to the nhs to making sure that carers free at the point of need to everyone who needs it is absolute and that will change or altered, i think with scene of the cause of the last two years spending on the nhs in real terms and additional spending on doctors and nurses so that will continue, but alongside that the problems of social care which would a sustainable long—term and so, these problems are being addressed of
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courage and thoughtfulness that does the promised a great credit. an net immigration, is it a mistake to yet again puta immigration, is it a mistake to yet again put a figure on the desire to reduce it to the tens of thousands. it is not worked in the past. why is theresa may going there again? had think people want migration to be reduced to sustainable levels and sustainable i think is tens of thousands. she's made that clear and i think that outside of the european union will be in a better position to control the number of people who come into the country. of course you wa nt to come into the country. of course you want to continue to attract talent, if people have skills that we need the example in the technology sector we would do anything we can to make sure they can come here. but, we need a balanced approach which which means putting net migration down. brexit, which theresa may began her speech of today, she said, as she has said before, that no deal is
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better than a bad deal, but does even the prospect of no deal make you somewhat nervous? no, i think that in this election the choices he wa nt to that in this election the choices he want to negotiate this deal, and i think anyone looking theresa may a strong and stable leader who was been authoritative and in control in seven been authoritative and in control in seve n yea rs been authoritative and in control in seven years and government can trust her approach with jeremy seven years and government can trust her approach withjeremy corbyn's nonsensical collection of absurd policy positions. they will know that theresa may is the person who is best equipped to secure that good brexit deal. thank you very much, michael grove. the labour leader jeremy corbyn has accused the conservatives of putting a tax on dementia. he says the plans published today on social care were bad idea and the principles of the nhs should be expanded and records the tories have made sue social care should be reversed. that is from the
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labour leader, jeremy corbyn. bass macro have made on social care should be reserved. thank you for joining us. a lot to look through, here. as i said to pauljohnson, initial thoughts from you and what you see in this manifesto launch? initial thoughts from you and what you see in this manifesto launch7m is just you see in this manifesto launch7m isjust come out you see in this manifesto launch7m is just come out in the last few minutes and we have not had a great chance to examine the details. i doing think there was much in there that tells is anything new about how economic policy will be formulated in the next administration if it is a conservative administration. i do not see any significant changes in the fiscal ruled that the government will adopt. i do not seen any mention of any change in the scope or wave the bank of england will be giving its targets in the future. also, i do not see any attention being paid the realfundamental problems the economy... if i may
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interrupt, to what extent is that being influenced by brexit, because there were so many variables it as we go ahead with this process? could be the case, the brexit negotiations will be long and difficult and they will be long and difficult and they will require the type of negotiations that we have not undertaken in this country for many decades. that is possibly providing a more policy logjam in whitehall. we have to deal with the question of brexit and decide what form of relations we will have with the european union and, at the same time and in the future the set of trading relationships will happen with the rest of the wealth. these are to rtu re rs rest of the wealth. these are torturers and complex but they have torturers and complex but they have to be arranged. —— with the rest of the world. underlying matter the deeper problems of the uk economy, low levels of productivity and investment in low levels of research and development expenditure, all of which helpers understand the low level of wheel rage growth which
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affects households. —— the low level of real wage growth. we cannot give the appropriate level of thinking power these modern deeper structural issues while we're thinking about leaving the european union. economists have worried about them the many decades. if that a strategic mistake in terms of not saying more in this manifesto about how to improve productivity, for example? i would not like to get into the world of commentating on political parties. they have an objection to win election, at the national institute of economic social... we're concerned about the deep structural problems we've seen year after year, decade after decade in the uk. as i have said before thatis in the uk. as i have said before that is low levels investment, productivity which leads to low real wage growth problems for households. thank you. and today at 5.30 on bbc news
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we will be putting your questions about the conservative manifesto to iain duncan smith, the former cabinet minister and of course tory party leader. you can text, tweet or e—mail. theresa may has launched the conservative manifesto in halifax, announcing plans for a major shake—up of social care funding in england, a watering—down of the government's pensions guarantee, and the introduction of means testing for the winter fuel allowance. president trump has said a special prosecutor appointed to lead a probe into alleged russian interference in last year's election will find there was no collusion by his campaign team. the former tv presenter rolf harris is being released on bail from stafford prison tomorrow. the veteran entertainer is currently on trial accused of indecently
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assaulting three girls between 1971 and 1983. the former tv presenter rolf harris is being released on bail from stafford prison tomorrow. the veteran entertainer is currently on trial at southwark crown court accused of indecently assaulting three girls between 1971 and 1983. mr harris denies four charges. earlier our correspondent helena lee joined us from outside the court. thejudge has told the judge has told the jury here at southwark crown court that bob harris is going to be released from stafford prison on bail tomorrow. —— rolf harris. the jury have already been told that he was convicted and sentenced in 201a. she told the jury, "the fact they have given him bail does not have any bearing on
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the decision you make." she is told them that he been of course appeared during this trial via video link and he will now appear in person for the remainder of his trial from monday. rolf harris is facing four counts of indecent assault charges, historical allegations between 1971 and 1983 allegations between 1971 and 1983 all relating to three victims, alleged victims between the ages of 13 and 16. the court is hearing evidence to day from the second of those alleged victims and she claims he assaulted her at a sports event in cambridge when she was 16 years old. the trial here continuing but to recapture that means, rolf harris is going to be released from stafford prison tomorrow on bail and is due to appear at his own trial here from monday. the court will not
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be sitting tomorrow and rolf harris denies all the charges against him. the lead singer of the american bands soundgarden and audioslave, chris cornell, has died at the age of 52. # arm yourself #. he won two grammy awards and was regarded as one of the leading voices in the 90s grunge movement. this was really shocking new soundgarden were in the middle of the us tour. they played in detroit's last night hours before the death of chris cornell. they we re the death of chris cornell. they were due to be headlining act in ohio. they were on the same bill in metallica. tributes to comment on the led zeppelin guitarist, rip chris cornell, incredibly talented. another meat is insane, so stunned to hear about chris cornell terrible
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and sadly lost. —— another musician says. we know he died after his gig and his representative has called his death sudden and unexpected and said his wife and family are shocked and will work closely with a medical examiner to establish the cause of death. he was the lead singer of soundgarden band formed in the mid—19 80s soundgarden band formed in the mid—1980s in soundgarden band formed in the mid—19 80s in seattle. they were pa rt mid—19 80s in seattle. they were part of the grand music —— grunge movement. soundgarden were popular because of the way the combined melancholic heavy—metal myths with psychedelia and pop sensibilities. by psychedelia and pop sensibilities. by 1994 psychedelia and pop sensibilities. by 199a they were one of the biggest bands in the united states, one of the —— one of the albums went platinum. the band split in 1997 and would be formed in 2010. chris cornell went on to have huge success with
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audioslave, a supergroup formed with members of rage against the machine and he did the theme tune for a james bond movie. sony wanted tougherjames bond and at the theme tune. that is why they went to chris cornell. a shocking bit of news, today. we are to real time to work out what the scenario was surrounding his death. with the award is taking place in london and that huge heavy metal festival taking place in the states over the weekend there will be lots of tributes being paid to him. the former first minister of wales and labour mp, rhodri morgan, has died suddenly at the age of 77. welsh labour and plaid cymru have suspended election campaigning today as a mark of respect. colleagues have described him as welsh through and through. james williams reports from cardiff. charismatic, intelligent, controversial. in an era of political soundbites,
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rhodri morgan spoke like no other politician. will you run again for leadership? does a one—legged duck swim in a circle? and yet he was a political animal to the core, first elected in 1987. but after the creation of the welsh assembly he had his heart set on taking the helm in cardiff. —— in cardiff bay. after two failures to do so, it would be the third time lucky. in february 2000. i think most of all, his great achievement was in bringing devolution into practical effect and helping it to grow and become popular at a time when it was on very shaky ground in those early years. during his time as first minister he would lead a labour administration and entered two coalitions. one with the liberal democrats, the other with plaid cymru. in office he pursued a strategy of putting clear water between his ministers in cardiff and tony blair's new labour.
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—— putting clear red water. paying tribute, the former prime minister said that mr morgan was an outstanding servant of wales, the united kingdom and the labour party. his successor says that wales is not just lost a great politician but a realfatherfigure. almost 2,000 species of plants have been discovered in the past year but many are already at risk of extinction. the royal botanic gardens at kew has released its annual assessment of the state of the world's plants and is calling for more to be done to protect them as helen briggs reports. into the forest in search of new plants. anything rare that has not been seen before is taken back to be
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nurtured and studied. from tiny waterlilies to strange, carnivorous plants. plants underpin all aspects of human living, from the air we breathe that to medicine and fuel. we have to take extinction very seriously. we still tend to put plants into the category of looking nice in the garden. we need to think about them as being fundamental to what we are. they are the natural capital of life on earth for humans. almost 2000 species of plant have been discovered in the past year alone. here in kew, there are many of the world's most precious plants. scientists say we have a better picture than ever before the value some are as an dangers the white rhino. scientists say we have a better picture than ever before the value of the world's plants.
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and we have a duty protect them. about 20% of the world's plants are at risk of extinction. the race is on to stop some being lost for good. ina in a moment simon mccoy is here with the news at one. but first, the weather. good afternoon the rest of the day will be an extra sunshine and showers, certainly brighter prospect than yesterday which bought this wedge of cloud is heavy rain. it looks like the clouds cleared but the web of system responsible is not quite done. there is another pulse of energy, another area of low pressure creeping in its way towards the south—east of the country. south eastern areas started off indecent show, blue skies and patchy cloud of the london. north—west scotland is seeing some heavies showers starting to develop which will continue
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through the afternoon with the rumble of thunder, plenty of showers the northern ireland and some sunny spells between the downpours. as we put into england and wales quite a few showers for western areas but the further east you are fewer showers across the midlands, north east england and east anglia. all the while across the south—east things will be clouding over, this afternoon. splashes of wayne working in. —— splashes of rain. some uncertainty about how file sarri fat west it will get. east anglia and lincolnshire and kent perhaps. further west, the showers fade away. it will get chilly in places but touch of grass frost. tomorrow, whetted eastern england, heaviest rain offshore as we go through the morning. troops and types of rains creeping across the east coast. some showers west. some heavy ones in western and south—western areas and
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temperatures are around the mid teens but cool under the cloud close to the east coast. the marines of the wet weather setting in crossed northern and eastern scotland. elsewhere, it is sunshine and showers and the odd hefty down poor. second half of the eastern sees this area of low pressure building into the cell. on sunday there will be fewer showers and more in the way of sunshine so actually a decent pay the many others. a bit more cloud and perhaps some rain into the far west. with more of a southerly wind ca ptu res west. with more of a southerly wind captures will climb to 20 degrees in london. —— temperatures will climb to 20 degrees in london. theresa may launches the conservative manifesto — and promises a stronger, fairer, and more prosperous britain.
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among her promises — a shake—up of social care. no—one will have to sell their property in their lifetime to fund care. but the money will come from their estate when they die. on brexit, the prime minister promises a fair deal, but predicts the next five years will be "among the most challenging in our lifetime". come with me as i lead britain. strengthen my hand as i fight for britain. and stand with me as i deliverfor britain. we'll be getting the latest live from the tories‘ manifesto launch in halifax and assessing how it would affect you. also this lunchtime: more pressure on president trump. a former fbi boss is brought in to investigate russia's role in the us election, and its ties with him. rolf harris will be released from prison on bail tomorrow and will attend court in person for the rest of a trial where he's
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